Yes
Full Circle Tour 2003

June 3rd, Vicar Street, Dublin, Ireland
June 11th, Tempodrom, Berlin, Germany
June 14th, Junge Garde, Dresden, Germany
June 22nd, Cirque Royal, Brussels, Belgium
June 24th, Ahoy', Rotterdam, The Netherlands
July 1st, Hammersmith Apollo, London, UK
July 3rd, Indoor Arena, Birmingham, UK
July 8th, Museumplatz, Bonn, Germany

By Kevin Murphy, Winston Arntz, Andreas Vogel, Craig O'Brien and Pía Matozzi


Vicar Street, Dublin, June 3rd

By Kevin Murphy

Recent times have been good for the Irish prog fan. In the past few years we've had visits from the likes of Jethro Tull, Dream Theater, Mike Oldfield, Porcupine Tree, The Strawbs, Marillion, Roger Waters and Ozric Tentacles. And now we have the third visit in as many years from Yes. Last time out, on the Yessymphonic Tour, the band chose to play the Point Depot, Dublin's shed-like 8,000-seater venue. Unfortunately, they were playing to a less than half full hall, but played superbly nonetheless. This time out, however, Yes have sensibly opted for the more intimate (and much better) 1500 capacity Vicar Street. This much more suitable venue along with the additional attraction of a certain Mr. Wakeman returning to the fold, guaranteed a sell-out this time around.

The first thing one noticed on entering the venue was the strong atmosphere of anticipation, Irish fans, young and not so young (mostly), eager at the prospect of finally seeing the classic Yes line-up in action. The next thing one noticed was the stage set, which looked as if they had cut up some of Rick Wakeman's old capes and strewn them about the stage.

Just after 8.30, the lights dimmed and the Firebird Suite intro began. One by one the band walked on stage to rapturous applause. Steve Howe first, followed by White, Squire, Anderson, and finally Wakeman who, it seemed, received the loudest cheer. Welcome back Rick!! Just like on Yessongs, just like on Keys to Ascension, Siberian Khatru was the opener. Initial sound balance problems made it hard to distinguish individual instruments, but this was quickly sorted and the band settled nicely. The title track of Magnification was up next and while it was a great version, I think it missed the orchestral arrangement from the album and Symphonic Tour. Then came the first surprise of the evening. Magnification segued straight into Don't Kill the Whale. This was never one of my favourite Yes tracks, but tonight it sounded magnificent and the band all seem to have enjoyed playing it very much. Another track from Magnification followed, the beautiful In the Presence of. Again I feel it lacked the orchestration, but was nonetheless a good version.

Jon Anderson Jon Anderson then began, in his own inimitable way, to explain what In the Presence of is about, until some heckler suggested that they "play some classic Yes." "Ok," replied Jon, "how about Southside of the Sky". Chris Squire then reminded Jon that he had forgotten something. Southside... would follow, but not before the wonderful We Have Heaven, complete with slamming door and running footstep effects. There seemed to be backing tapes used for some of the vocal parts, but who cares. It was just great to hear this track played 'live'. Southside... proved to be a tour-de-force rendition, and was for me the highlight of the evening. The extended solo duel between Howe and Wakeman was a joy to behold. Two master musicians excelling at their craft, and having a lot of fun doing it. Classics we wanted, and classics we got. The band next played a song, which Jon said was "something we threw together on a wet Tuesday afternoon just over thirty years ago." Well this was a wet Tuesday evening, and And You and I sounded as awesome now as I'm sure it did then.

We now came to the inevitable solo part of the evening. Never my favourite part of any show, the solos can prove to be ruination of what has been up to then a good gig (anybody remember the awful 9012Live - the Solos?). Tonight's solo section was a bit of a mixed bag. A very relaxed and happy looking Steve Howe was up first. Steve began with In the Course of the Day, a jaunty picking tune from his album Natural Timbre. A nice piece, but it maybe went on a bit too long before he played The Clap. Nice, but would love to have heard Mood for a Day. Ah well, can't have everything.

Jon Anderson was back on stage now and played what I felt was a very nondescript acoustic song, which I didn't recognise and didn't catch the title of. Jon then introduced us to "Mr Wakeup" on keyboards, and we were treated to a wonderful solo piece by Rick, which featured all his usual tricks - bits of The Six Wives... and King Arthur... as well some ragtime and even an Irish jig. Terrific fun!!

Chris Squire The rest of the band returned to the stage, and from here on in it was classic Yes all the way. Long Distance Runaround began this final set, followed by The Fish which, (naturally) prominently featured Chris Squire. But a nice surprise lay in store. Anderson, Howe & Wakeman left the stage again, leaving Squire and White to run through thundering versions of Tempus Fugit and On the Silent Wings of Freedom. I definitely never expected to hear anything from Drama even if it was only an instrumental duet version. The others returned in time to segue the music back into The Fish. By now this was exhilarating stuff. How much classic Yes can you have in one evening? Not enough in my opinion. Heart of the Sunrise followed, and finally we were treated to what is my own personal all-time favourite Yes song, Awaken. From the frantic opening piano run, right through to Howe's final flurry of notes, this song has everything that classic Yes is about. Soaring melodies, pounding bass lines, intricate solos and a great quiet-to-loud middle section. Awesome!

After two hours, Yes left the stage. I'd have gone home very happy by now, but didn't have to. The band returned quickly to deliver a couple more classics, but not before Jon Anderson lead audience and band in a chorus of Happy Birthday for Alan White's mum who was sat in the audience. And so to the encores. As pretty much expected, we got Roundabout in a slightly edited version and also a powerhouse Starship Trooper, complete with Squire's deafening bass notes at the end. What a night.

Three years, three Yesshows in Dublin, three different line-ups, and three very different set lists, all adding up to one class act. In a word, YES!!

Photos © Black Cat


Full Circle Yes - Europe 2003

by Winston Arntz

35 years ago a band called Yes stepped onto stage to release their music upon an unsuspecting world. This band would evolve to a barriere-breaking group of musicians who saw no musical borders to stay in to. In 1973 the bands' line up consisted of Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Alan White and Rick Wakeman. With Tales From Topograpohic Oceans a new piece in music history was written and invoked a magic spell over the band. Yesfans for all over the world often think of the ASHWW line up as the best ever. Through numerous changes, arguments and two bands wanted to be called Yes in the 80's, 2002 saw the definite return of the magic again.

A tour in the U.S. laid down the foundation to re-find the live interaction what turned out be not too easy in the beginning. But half way through that tour 'the spell' was found again and a bright shining future came shining through...at last.

Before the expected new album the band decided to treat Europe and Australasia to the Full Circle treatment as well but when Jon Anderson fell of a ladder while hanging the Christmas lights for the holidays Yes had to postpone that plan for a few months. I for one was glad that Yes would be here in the summer, a great way to spend my vacation!

Berlin
Jon Anderson First up for me was june 11 in Berlin in the beautiful Tempodrom, right in the centre of Germany's capital city.

In a venue that was flled for about three quarters, I witnessed for the very first time the ultimate, the magic. I can only imagine how it must have been in the 70's when the legendary albums were fresh and new. A very moving and powerful show with great acoustics and most of all; I saw a real band on stage. Interacting with each other, smiling faces of a true feeling of friendship. In the set almost all songs of the Fragile album were featured with South Side Of The Sky being the surprise song. A song that drummer Alan White never played before because Bill Bruford recorded it, but he played it with great precision and power, it was incredible almost. The audience, in Germany often timid, picked up the very positive atmosphere and amazed the band even during Long Distance Runaround when it seemed that a 2000-headed choir stood up in front of them. A great sight to see and hear. I've been to a lot of Yes shows since 1989 but I never saw these 5 guys together being Yes. The sound is so tight and perfectly balanced that it is almost uncanny. Rick Wakeman
The role of Rick Wakeman can only be played by Rick Wakeman but a good sound engineer is needed; mixing this band is a difficult task as I would learn later in Rotterdam. Berlin gave me a perfectly performed Awaken, the song Yes and its fans see as the very best song they ever made.      

Brussels
About two weeks later I came to Brussels to see the band there in the Cirque Royal, which is a theater with seats only. A great chance to see Yes put on their show while sitting down in comfortable seats and see how they do it. I stil don't know how but this show was just as great as the Berlin show, with the only difference that they played a different song in the encores; Starship Trooper was traded for Yours Is No Disgrace, so I thought that was really nice of the band. The only thing bad that it was very, very hot in the old venue which seemed to drain the energy out of both the audience and band a bit. Nevertheless after each song the band received standing ovations so it could also have been the damn seats as well. Brussels was fab too and worth the expensive ticket (EUR 63!!).
Rotterdam
Next up was Rotterdam, well known territory for the band. In several era's the band took the stage there and parts of the live album Yesshows were even recorded there. I saw my first Yes concert there too (ABWH) so it was Full Circle for me as well. My hopes were up when I saw how many people were there, just one side of the second floor ring was closed so 7500 Steve Howe people had come to see Yes. Holland rules! It was great to see the look on Jon Anderson's face when he discovered this too. He really means it when he says that as long as Yes will have and audience they will continue.

The beginning of the show suffered from a bad soundmix; too low in volume and Anderson's voice was drowned in the mix. The Ahoy' has a reputation of being hard to handle for soundcrews, unfortunately it took a while to get it right. But I was spoiled with 2 shows already so I could focus on the band and the audience. I saw complete families, fathers and sons, the 'Lowlands generation', the original fans with beards and bald heads and of course the fanatics. They all looked very satisfied and happy that they were able to see Yes again in 2003. Everywhere around me I heard people sharing their memories and experiences and how fantastic this show turned out to be. It was! No thanks to the soundguy, especially in the first half. Yes enjoyed the immense response and turn up very much. Jon Anderson was extra thankful and he kept on saying it in between the songs. He even extended his 'solo' with a funny happy birthday song. He does have humor and isn't always that guy from another planet or the singing angel.
His voice was a bit raspy in the first part of this show but this was 'solved' at the beginning of part two. Another suprise in the encores; now Yours Is No Disgrace was traded for Your Move / All Good People, a song written about the people in Holland or so I've been told. I later found out that they were trading so often so they could play an extended set of songs at the Hyde Park gig in London, which was cancelled because the concertpromotor went bankrupt. Too bad because Yes kind of planned the 35th birthday party there. Maybe they will try to make it up this year...if not the 2004 tour will.
So Rotterdam was great too but for other reasons; a thankful band and audience, the ovation after the last encore went on and on and it came very close to a third encore, I don't know why they didn't return.

Bonn
The last show I saw was in Bonn, again two weeks apart. An open air show, a first for me with Yes. The Museumplatz is a very cosy and friendly venue. A big Tent like roof would have sheltered us from any rain but the weather was great, warm and sunny...Together with a group of friends I was Alan White able to enjoy the show to the max and so I did. The stage was close to the audience again so I could see the member interactions again. Once again the smiling faces, even when Jon had few ear-monitor problems and Rick Wakeman went astray in Magnification. The apologizing look on his face when the song was finished told us and the band that he pushed all the right buttons...it sounded a bit strange but being Rick Wakeman he improvised suitably. There was a videocrew filming the show with three camera's for big screens on the site, I never saw that at Yes concert before. I don't know if this material will surface on a official release somewhere but I definately want a copy... In general, Bonn also was very much worth the trip and ticket, you just can't go wrong with Yes. It's simple as that.

In September the last leg will start in Australia and Asia. Next year in June and July Europe will be treated with 15 exclusive shows; with a big Roger Dean designed stage, extended set and a expositon of Yes memorabilia, (12 shows first in the U.S. in april and may) so the party still isn't over, it's just getting started!

Chris Squire

Photos © Yesfocus


Junge Garde, Dresden, June 14th

By Andreas Vogel

They ARE weird, aren't they?

I mean, look at Chris Squire. That fuzzy hairdo, that silky shirt from yesteryear, that massive body in those shiny tights stomping across the stage. Or, take Rick Wakeman, the man for whom the word 'keyboard wizard' was coined: this awe-inspiring stature, clad in a waving cape embroidered with golden symbols, the long, blonde hair bordering a grave face. Alan White is not that weird; he hides behind his drumkit most of the time. But there's Steve Howe - he's weird, too. Doesn't he look like some very old, very skinny professor of anthropology who seldom sees the light of day? You wouldn't expect that man to handle umpteen types of guitars within a really short amount of time, would you? And Jon Anderson? Well, the 'place of residence' entry in his passport surely reads 'not this planet' or something like that. This small man seems to soar in heavenly spheres that normal people like us are unable to reach. And the moment he came on stage, I thought 'Oh my God, Anderson forgot to get dressed!' He still wore his pyjamas, or some sort of funny-coloured leisure tracksuit…

Jon Anderson Hold it, hold it…! To all the Yes fans who are on the verge of getting angry, please calm down. For that is just the outside, folks. And the outside dwindles down to utter insignificance once one perceives the music the band creates, or better- have been creating for the past 35 years. Looking back, we behold a vast catalogue of groundbreaking compositions, many of them timeless classics; there are self-indulgent epics as well as simple-yet-good pop songs, plus a few fruitless ventures, too, but on the whole that is an oeuvre which to label 'impressive' would be a shameless understatement.

It's good to see that the boys are still around to celebrate that oeuvre, now again in what one might call the classic line-up. It may be true that Yes are somehow losing touch with the musical interests of todays' audiences - their aim is obviously not to attract new fans but to give their old ones what they crave for. And apart from doing the obvious orchestra collaboration, experimentation, or progress, is not their cup of tea any more. They're doing what the do best: performing their trademark music with an undiminished joyfulness and a mind-boggling competence. So, a Yes gig these days seems to be shrouded in an overwhelming air of nostalgia, and it proves to be a great pleasure to revel in that once in a while.

The surroundings of the Dresden concert - an open air stage amidst towering trees - nourished that back-to-the-roots kind of feeling, and Siberian Kathru, composed three decades ago, aptly opened the set. The following material included songs considerably more recent but unmistakably just as 'yes-ish': Magnification and In the Presence of. The 'Fragile' era was then represented by South Side of the Sky - a very good choice.

Meanwhile, somebody in the audience had unrolled a big banner saying "Happy Birthday Alan!". Anderson seized the opportunity to strike up a birthday song for Alan White, with the audience cheerfully joining in. In such moments, the strong bonds that the band have developed with their fans become most apparent. The Yes community appears to be a big family, a family that spans continents, a family whose members are growing old in comfortable togetherness.

Rick Wakeman When Steve Howe gently struck his chords to launch And you and I, the crowd went wild with excitement. A great track indeed, an old-timer, and still in splendid shape. As its final notes had died away, Howe stepped forward for his obligatory solo bit, while his band mates left the stage. When he went to work, you just couldn't help looking for the other two guitarists in the background. There were none, of course. It was all him who produced what sounded like one whole guitar orchestra, and he appeared to do it effortlessly. The frantic applause that ensued after The Clap Howe met with a shy smile and a humble bow - that's the old school.

The first track after the intermission had Anderson perform a previously unknown song on his own, joined later by Wakeman, who immediately continued with his solo spot, displaying dazzling keyboard wizardry. Heart of the Sunrise came next, an absolute favourite of mine that won't stop thrilling me: just listen to how these old men pound away! The sequence of Long Distance Runaround, Whitefish, and On the silent Wings of Freedom gave Chris Squire the opportunity to present himself to best advantage. I have seen many bass guitarists - from Levin to Waters, from Edwin to Myung, from Gunn to Trewavas - and the Chris Squire Show confirms once again that to play the bass guitar is an art form in itself.

At one point during the gig a droll thing happened: Jon Anderson was doing one of his dreamy announcements (which to outsiders, by the way, must seem rather embarrassing: just consider such profound insights like "Love is very powerful, you know." that Anderson usually strives to convey to his audience…), when he stopped in mid-sentence, craned his neck a little and said, "I can smell marihuana!". And I swear I saw his eyes water as he momentarily went into raptures about how the old days were, back then, in the sixties…

A splendid Awaken concluded the main set, the following encores being Roundabout and Starship Trooper. It is amazing how much more convincing this age-old music seems if you dare to compare it to nowadays' average pop/rock output. Not in terms of 'zeitgeist', obviously, but one cannot help realizing that there is true creativity in there, there's superb technique as well, and it is music that I would want to call 'honest'. Why is it that many music productions these days - except of course the ones coming out of the small but very much alive progressive corner - lack all of those qualities? I don't know… but I should really like to get a bunch of those self-ascribed musicians to attend a Yes concert, and tell them, "Look. Listen. Learn.". However, considering the dumbness and ignorance that prevail in popular main stream today, those candidates would probably assess the performance as nothing but "weird".

Photos © Black Cat


Hammersmith Apollo, London, July 1st

By Craig O'Brien

Tonight's Yes gig is the first of two "homecoming" shows for the band on the "Full Circle" tour which is a celebration of the bands work over the past 35 years.

The Hammersmith Apollo (formerly the Hammersmith Odeon) was a great choice of venue as it is a beautiful old theatre and was the perfect venue in which to experience the lengthy work-outs of Messrs. Anderson, Howe, Wakeman, White and Squire. And this being my first Yes gig, I definitely was not disappointed by these ageing gentlemen of progressive rock. Indeed, it was actually quite a change tonight feeling like one of the younger members of the audience compared with most gigs I go to as there appeared to be a few people in attendance who probably saw Yes back in the earlier 1970's.

Steve Howe So, as 7.45pm struck, the band appeared on stage to a rapturous applause and a standing ovation which was testament to the fan-worship that was to be exuded during the show. The band launched into Siberian Khatru and this track really summed up what was to be delivered over the ensuing 2 & ½ hours - outstanding musicianship, epic song cycles and a bunch of guys on stage genuinely enjoying what they were doing. Rick Wakeman was back in his rightful place behind a huge bank of keyboards, Alan White was pounding on his kit, Chris Squire was playing his bass like a 1970's lead guitarist, Steve Howe played his guitar like it was an extension of his body and Jon Anderson, looking like he hasn't aged a day in 20 years, provided the ethereal passages so essential to Yes' music.

Magnification followed the powerful set opener, and whilst not in the same class as its predecessor, it is still a welcome addition to the Yes catalogue. In contrast, In the Presence of, from the same album, sounded majestic and soared across the venue and really showed that Yes still possess the magic to compose some great tunes. Don't Kill The Whale, sandwiched in-between both of these newer songs, compared equally to the songs from the 21st century and shows no signs of ageing.

Next up was an early show highlight with We Have Heaven segueing into a truly powerful version of South Side of the Sky. To say that the band had the audience in the palm of their hands was an under-statement as the crowd were in a rapture throughout these lengthy compositions. And just when I thought the band couldn't take this great feeling any higher, And You and I (dedicated to Jon Anderson's wife) just blew the roof off the emotions coming from the stage, and indeed, coming back from the audience. Its difficult to find the right superlatives to heap onto this tune as it's such a beautiful song with the right mix of colour and light.

Both these songs really showed off not only the outstanding skills of each band member, but also showed that after so many years together, it's like watching a fine time-piece operating, with each of its constituent parts working perfectly with the other.

Following such an enormous performance, it was a shame to end the first set with Steve Howe's solo spot, which let the pace fall away. Whilst there's not doubting Steve Howes' guitar playing skills, most Yes songs give all band members a chance to stretch themselves in their chosen area of music, that solos are almost redundant. Still, the crowd loved it so who am I to complain!

Rick Wakeman Following a 20 minute intermission, it was Rick Wakeman's turn for a solo spot, which whilst show-casing how good a musician he is, it perhaps edged into the indulgence department a little bit too much. Thankfully, these solo sections were followed by yet another of the show's highlights, Heart of the Sunrise, which is an additional example of the band playing together, as one unit, and sounding amazing as a result. A great Long Distance Runaround followed, which lead into the highlight of the evening, set-closer Awaken.

Massive doesn't seem to be a big enough word to describe the wall of sound the band was creating. If it wasn't Chris Squire and Alan White trading thundering sounds, it was Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman having a musical duel, upping the performances each time. I truly felt during this song that there was an amazing transcendence between band and audience whereby everyone was part of the music. Religious experience isn't too strong a word to describe how it felt. What a way to leave the stage!

The band returned then for three encores, comprising some of the shorter (well, shorter than Awaken!) and punchier songs in their repertoire. I've Seen All People started off acoustic and just grew and grew into a huge finale. The ever-present Roundabout sounded as it always does and was followed by an excellent rendition of Yours Is No Disgrace, which lasted for ages. It was like the band just didn't want to leave the stage. And, when they did, the audience couldn't thank them enough for the heart and soul they'd just shown their fans.

I really can't fault Yes' performance tonight, other than the extended solo spots (which I wasn't surprised to see), but I'm being pedantic. This is a band still making and enjoying their music, that whilst unfashionable to most of the population, could teach the bands filling the charts today a thing or two about what music is supposed to be about.

Photos © Black Cat


Indoor Arena, Birmingham, July 3rd

By Pía Matozzi

Once again The National Indoor Arena, in Birmingham was the venue for a Yes concert.
Living in the other side of the world for many years the idea to see Yes was just a dream. I guess this is why I accept more easily what they have to offer. Of course, I have my favourites like everyone else. But for me it's more important to have the chance and pleasure to see these excellent and talented musicians playing their music.
I arrived soon after the doors were opened and I went in to find my seat. I had only 15 rows in front of me, Steve side. Not too bad, eh? Something unexpected was to see those cameras, 5 at least. Are we going to have a new DVD soon?

This time was a full house. And the time came when the lights went out while we could hear the Firebird Suite. Do I need to mention that a huge standing ovation welcomed the band as they came to the stage? How long did it last I've no idea but my hands were aching and they hadn't even played the first song.

Chris Squire I have no complaints about the sound. The stage set was a bit simple, but this is just a personal taste.
Each and every member of the band in his own way and with his own personality showed us once more what they can do when they are together.
Jon with a voice like an angel who always makes us wondering how he manages those notes, talking between songs and playing a variety of instruments. Chris the giant that wanders through the stage astonishing every one with those duels, teasing the audience before his solo and enjoying as much as everyone. Steve the serious of the group surprising us as he plays his guitars. Alan behind his drums playing in a spectacular way to get notice. Rick who seems to have 10 arms moving around trying to rich all the keyboards and showing what he can do.

The highlights for me were Siberian Khatru: one of those classics that I always like to hear and like many others it has such a power. Heart Of The Sunrise: one of those songs where everyone stand out within the band. And You And I: a classic interpreted with style. Magnification: a very good version. South Side Of The Sky a great piece that sounded superb. I'm glad it was in the set list. Awaken: What can I say? It was amazing, mesmerising. I always smile when I see Jon's harp is taken to the stage. It's like a silent sign saying 'be ready Awaken is next'.
Chris and Alan's solos were fantastic. Where do they get energy! Rick's solo was very impressive. Steve's solo was very good but for some reason I wasn't mad about it. Jon's Birthday Song didn't convince me much. I've Seen All Good People and Roundabout were the encores.
Funny was to hear the Disney tune at the beginning of the second part.
The show was amazing, absolutely wonderful. The magic of Yes was there that night.
Without doubt it was a spectacular concert presented for 5 gifted musicians that know how to deliver their music in a very special way and with style. A show that all of us that we were there will remember.

Photos © Black Cat


Setlists:

Dublin
June 3rd:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
In The Course Of The Day
Clap
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

Roundabout
Starship Trooper

Berlin
June 11th:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
To Be Over
Second Initial
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

Roundabout
Starship Trooper

Dresden
June 14th:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
In The Course Of The Day
Clap
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

Roundabout
Starship Trooper

Brussels
June 22nd:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
To Be Over
Clap
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

Roundabout
Yours Is No Disgrace

Rotterdam
June 24th:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
To Be Over
Clap
Happy Birthday
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

I've Seen All Good People
Roundabout

London
July 1st:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
To Be Over
Clap
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

I've Seen All Good People
Roundabout
Yours Is No Disgrace

Birmingham
July 3rdth:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
To Be Over
Clap
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

I've Seen All Good People
Roundabout

Bonn
July 8th:

Firebird Suite
Siberian Khatru
Magnification
Don't Kill The Whale
In The Presence Of
We Have Heaven
South Side Of The Sky
And You And I
To Be Over
Clap
Show Me
Wakeman Solo
Heart Of The Sunrise
Long Distance Runaround
Whitefish
On The Silent Wings Of Freedom
Awaken

I've Seen All Good People
Roundabout


 

Photos:
Berlin, Brussels, Rotterdam and Bonn photos © Yesfocus 2003.
All other photos by Wendy Wilson, © Black Cat 2003.

 

Back to the Concert Reviews Archive

 

© 2003 DPRP